MSc in Water – Engineering track

MSc in Water - Engineering track

Why to study MSc in Water – Engineering track

 

 

semester 1:

Introduction to Integrated Water Resource Management

To understand the overall processes involved in IWRM beginning with data collection, data analysis, system description, and then moving to consensus building, communications, education, monitoring and assessment To provides a brief historical background and overview of IWRM and gives an overview of the various aspects of IWRM, from integration, capacity building to applications and case studies To identify relevant aspects of IWRM in hydrologically sensitive regions To develop innovative concepts, methods and technologies To be able through modelling and system analysis as basis to investigate and implement IWRM initiatives.

credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 1st semester

Water Quality and Sanitation

To understand the types of organic and inorganic substances of natural and anthropogenic origin that are present in natural water, drinking water, municipal and some types of industrial wastewater. To understand the physical and chemical processes that occur when those waters are used, mixed with other waters, or interact with soil, sediments, atmosphere and infrastructure. To get an overview of the role of microorganisms in natural and anthropogenic environments, understand microbial diversity of aquatic ecosystems and aquatic nutrient cycles. To get an overview of symptoms, pathways of transmission, disease burden and prevention of major water born diseases. To understand health and environmental risks caused by natural or anthropogenic contaminants and get to know basics of microbial interactions with humans with focus on water borne pathogens. To understand the principles and being able to use most important analytical methods for the determination of chemical compounds present in water samples and get practical experience with basic experimental working techniques used in microbiology.

African Water Resources and Scenarios

The course confers knowledge about the African water resources and their characteristics and their uses, the range of issues African countries face when dealing with their water resources the policy approaches developed to deal with the issues and the various plans to improve their use and situation and the range of relevant climate change and socio-economic scenarios and their effect on African water resources and their use. Students will be qualified to analyse the typical constellations of African water resources and their uses, to identify the issues resulting from these constellations to assess the existing and proposed policy options qualitatively with respect to their adequacy given the existing societal objectives, under the variations due to the water scenarios.

Fluid Mechanics

This course should allow students to understand the various theories of fluid mechanics. Aside from basic concepts (characteristics and properties of fluids, compressibility, viscosity, surface tension, basic characteristics of fluid flow and fluid statics) it will thus cover topics such as laminar unidirectional flow, fundamentals of turbulent flows, hydrodynamic lubrication, the flow of an ideal fluid as well as flow with a free surface.

credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 1st semester

Hydrology

This course introduces hydrologic cycle, system concept, hydrologic system model, hydrologic model classification and the development of hydrology. It then moves on to watershed morphometry (definition, study of form, study of stream networks, relief study), atmospheric water (atmospheric circulation, precipitation, rainfall, evaporation and evapotranspiration, climate study), subsurface and surface water (unsaturated flow, infiltration, sources of stream flow, stream flow hydrograph), hydrologic measurement (measurements of surface water, hydrological measurement system) and finally hydrologic analysis (hydrologic statistics and frequency analysis, modelling in hydrology).

credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 1st semester

Academic writing

The course will focus on the connections between research process, academic writing and the structure of academic texts. Students will also be introduced to grammar and style for academic purposes with a particular focus on technical subjects and the problem of communicating technical subjects in an understandable manner (to a non-expert audience). Special attention will also be given to issues of clarity, logic and coherence. Finally, the course will cover citation techniques, references and the issue of plagiarism.
credit course, 20 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering and Policy Track, 1st semester

Project Design and Management

The course aims at imparting to the students’ knowledge of theories and commonly used processes of project cycle management and Logical Framework Approach (LFA), and will cover the tools and techniques for identification, analysis, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of sustainable development of water and energy programs and projects.

credit course, 30 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering and Policy Track, 1st semester

African history

This course aims at providing the history of Africa in the wider context of the world history. It examines the evolution and development of African states and societies, the cultural systems, the social and political structures, the development of technology and agriculture as well as broad changes and continuities in Africa’s historical development. The course will also illustrate how Africans have influenced regions beyond their continent’s borders, how they have been influenced from the outside.
credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Energy, and Water, Track, 1st semester

 

semester 2:

Human rights and gender

This course considers the ways that human rights frameworks have been applied to issues of gender, particularly in Africa, through the emergence of Women’s Human Rights. It provides the political movements and legal and policy arguments that helped formulation of Women’s Human Rights, starting with feminist criticism of the gender bias in human rights frameworks

credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Energy, and Water, Track, 2nd semester

Hydraulics (Open Channel Hydraulics and Flows under Pressure)

The course is designed to give the students a solid understanding of hydraulics (open channel hydraulics and flows under pressure), particularly in steady, gradually varied flow, and a basis for the design of free surface systems. After attending this course, a student will be able to describe the various types of flows in open channels, the velocity distribution across and along the channel and hydraulic jumps. The technical lecture (flows under pressure) uses modelling: concepts and methods of computational assisted design are widely used in the projects.

credit course, 50 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 2nd semester

Hydrology

This course introduces hydrologic cycle, system concept, hydrologic system model, hydrologic model classification and the development of hydrology. It then moves on to watershed morphometry (definition, study of form, study of stream networks, relief study), atmospheric water (atmospheric circulation, precipitation, rainfall, evaporation and evapotranspiration, climate study), subsurface and surface water (unsaturated flow, infiltration, sources of stream flow, stream flow hydrograph), hydrologic measurement (measurements of surface water, hydrological measurement system) and finally hydrologic analysis (hydrologic statistics and frequency analysis, modelling in hydrology).

credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 1st semester

Sanitation and Water Treatment (Drinking Water and Sewage)

The course qualifies students to understand the global and African situation with regard to the issues of excreta, wastewater, and solid waste disposal and comprehend the connection between these processes and health, resource conservation and environmental protection. In addition, it enables students to understand the global and African situation with regard to the issues of water resources and drinking water and its relation to health, resource conservation and environmental protection and to know scientific, technical and engineering principles of drinking water abstraction, distribution and use and factors affecting their efficiency, costs, sustainability and acceptability.

credit course, 60 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering and Policy Track, 2nd semester

Soil conservation

The course confers knowledge about the issues facing soil erosion and sedimentation, their determinants and modelling as well as the land use and technical options to control and the socio-economic factors influencing soil erosion and sedimentation. It will also draw implications for the nutrient and carbon processes in soil and water. The students will learn to derive proposals to solve problems related to soil and water conservation and to assess existing policies.

credit courses, 50 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 2st semester

Research Methods for Water engineering

This course provides an introduction to research methods. It imparts knowledge on how to design research questions and hypotheses. It also teaches basic skills in qualitative and quantitative methods, data collection and analysis, design and structure of experiments. It provides knowledge on research strategies and the generation of instruments and tools for experimentation specific to water engineering. It imparts knowledge on reporting of research findings including ethical considerations and the validation of results. Innovation, patenting, and technological transfer are also discussed.

credit courses, 30 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 2nd semester

Communication, Marketing and Networking

Introduction to networking. Why network. Types of networks: social, professional and business networks, use of social media and ICT. Sources of contacts for networking. Face-to-face and electronic networking, donor supported and self-sustaining networks, voluntary, membership and profit-making networks. Typical weaknesses and strengths, dos and don’ts, managing expectations, sustainability, institutional issues in networking.

credit course, 20 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering and Policy Track, 2nd semester

semester 3:

Water economics

The course confers knowledge about the economic principles and economic tools applicable to water policy issues pertaining to water resource issues prevalent in African countries, the determinants of water demand and water supply projects for storage and bulk conveyance. Students will be qualified to apply the economic tools to specific problems in the African context, to derive policy proposals to solve water resource related problems, to assess existing policy proposals and to assess the quality of related scientific research and assess research gaps. Furthermore students will be qualified to judge the problems and the perspectives for the improvement of the status of national water policies and projects in African countries in order to perform well as water professionals on the national level, in international organizations and as consultants.

Credit course, 60 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering and Policy Track, 3rd semester

Water for Agriculture 1: Irrigation Techniques & Drainage

The goal of the course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to assess, plan and design agricultural surface and sub-surface drainage works. At the completion of the course the students should be able to understand crop water needs; manage soil moisture to promote desired crop response; evaluate irrigation; optimize the use of available water supplies; minimize irrigation induced erosion; decrease non-point source pollution of surface and groundwater resources; manage salts in the crop root zone; choose the appropriate and effective techniques of irrigation to the crop; understand tile drainage design; design, test, and analyse agricultural irrigation systems and their components (gravity irrigation, sprinkler irrigation, trickle irrigation).

credit course, 50 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering and Policy Track, 3 rd semester

Water for Agriculture 2: Irrigation Project Design

Collection and analysis of climatic, soil and crop data. Determination of crop water requirements and gross irrigation requirements; Choice of the optimal cropping pattern based on different simulation scenarios (limited water availability, use of saline water, etc.) and economic criteria. Determination of specific continuous discharge; Hydraulic design of a large scale distribution network; Cost/Benefit analysis. Environmental Impact Assessment Applications; Synthesis, conclusions and reporting.

credit courses, 50 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 3 rd semester

physical instrumentation & measurements

The goals of the course are to make better measurements, understand the physical principals of the parameters, to use those measurements in any research project to better evaluate their use and their spatial variability, and to make better use of them in the evaluation, planification or in the management of water. The course covers the physical principles of measurement, principal parameters (measurement of water level, flow rate, speed of water, sedimentation and conductivity of water), the chains of measurement (automatic) and the equipment for manual measurement.

credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 3rd semester

Applied Numerical Analysis and Modelling

This course will provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts, computer implementation and water models. It should impart the basic skills needed to use the finite element method to solve numerical problems. It will thus cover finite and element difference methods as well as finite volume methods (Godunov scheme summary; Minmod limiter, flux limiting function formulation, Hartens’s sufficient conditions for numerical method to be TVD, extension to systems of linear PDE’s, extension to nonlinear PDE’s, mat lab implementation; two dimensional advection; groundwater modelling by finite element method). At the same time it should guide the student in developing a critical eye for computational matters; and practical skills in applying methods to predict applied situations.

credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering Track, 3rd semester

Geographical Information Systems

At the end of the course, the student will be able to design a GIS application, to understand how multi sources data is structured in a GIS software, to know the potential analysis that can be done in various situations to produce useful information to support decision making in planning, monitoring and management of resources (water, forests, soil, lands) and infrastructures (drinking-water systems, a network of roads and tracks,...), to choose the type of GIS software to operate according to its needs, be aware of the problems associated with the information flow and the reliability of data used in a GIS for the success of its operations. The course will cover modelling geographical space (systemic approach), the methodology for developing a Data Conceptual Model (DCM), numeric modelling in GIS (topologic and non-topologic system), acquisition digital, Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Quality of data.

Credit course, 40 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering, 3rd semester

entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship

This course seeks to enhance students’ entrepreneurial/ intrapreneurial mind-sets, skills and behaviour – with or without a commercial objective. Students should learn to identify, explore and promote business opportunities or opportunities for development/advancement as independent actors or embedded in institutions in the public, private or civil society sector. They are to confront practical business challenges and opportunities in the private sector and challenges for development in the public and civil society sector, conduct a market and needs analysis as well as competitor and stakeholder mapping for business / project ideas and draft a first business / project plan presenting milestones and risks.

Credit course, 20 contact hours, to be taught in Water, Engineering and Policy Track, 3rd semester

 

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Le Lorem Ipsum est simplement du faux texte employé dans la composition et la mise en page avant impression. Le Lorem Ipsum est le faux texte standard de l’imprimerie depuis les années 1500

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Testimonials

T1: Theobald from Rwanda, MSc Water Policy: "The teachers at PAUWES are well-
qualified, and they communicate the course content through different activities like group
discussions. Moreover, our research skills are being developed and we get a good
understanding of the concepts of our field of studies which helps us to develop our career as
future policy makers. I also appreciate the different extra-curricular activities we participate
in: visits of the beautiful areas and historical features of Algeria, conferences, various clubs
and games and the different religion services. These help us to acquire different skills and get
to know the cultures of the comrades from different African nations.”

T2 : “PAUWES gave me the chance to discover the mentality of different students who come
from each part of Africa. With PAUWES, I am able to travel around all Africa to discover this
magic continent. It offers the opportunity to get real professional experience, which opens
different networks for our future. I had many professors from different countries, which
allowed me to develop my knowledge. Come to Algeria – believe me, you’ll never feel that
you are far from home. It’ll be your new family.”

 

Contact Info

Pan African University Institute of Water and Energy Sciences - PAUWES

c/o Tlemcen University, B.P. 119 | Pôle Chetouane, Tlemcen 13000

Algeria

Email: info@pauwes.dz

M: +213 43 41 04 35

F: +213 43 41 04 99

Social media links

African Union Agenda 2063

A strategic framework for the socio-economic transformation of the continent over the next 50 years. It builds on, and seeks to accelerate the implementation of past and existing continental initiatives for growth and sustainable development. These include STISA 2024, the Lagos Plan of Action

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